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danielelmore@gmail.com
New member
Username: Coldfusion

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2006 - 07:29 am:   

I'm really interested in nowsms but need help getting rolling. The goal is to have a server sending and receiving SMS only.

Should I invested in a dedicated modem or get an actual cell phone? Do the dedicated modems use sim cards?

Who will I be able to send SMS too? I hear that Sprint and Verizon use CDMA, does that mean my GSM modem won't be able to send SMS to them?

Thank you for your time
Bryce Norwood - NowSMS Support
Board Administrator
Username: Bryce

Post Number: 5742
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2006 - 07:10 pm:   

Hi,

It depends on your message volume. Generally speaking a dedicated modem provides better reliability and throughput.

Beyond that, it is usually the ability to send/receive MMS that pushes you people to dedicated modem devices.


quote:

Do the dedicated modems use sim cards?




Yes, dedicated GSM modems use SIM cards. They require a subscription to a mobile operator, just like a mobile phone.


quote:

Who will I be able to send SMS too? I hear that Sprint and Verizon use CDMA, does that mean my GSM modem won't be able to send SMS to them?




You can exchange (send/receive) messages with anyone that the mobile operator to which the modem is connected can exchange messages with.

I think an example will help explain it better. Let's say you have a GSM mobile phone with Cingular. As a Cingular subscriber, you can exchange SMS messages with all of the other major US mobile operators. The same is true if you are using the mobile phone as a modem (or using the SIM in a dedicated modem device).

So this interoperability is dependent on the mobile operator through which you are connecting, not a function of the device itself.

There is a lack of widespread support for sending/receiving SMS via modems in CDMA environments. But as long as the GSM operators has interoperability, a GSM modem can exchange messages with CDMA subscribers.

-bn
Daniel
New member
Username: Coldfusion

Post Number: 2
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2006 - 11:02 pm:   

Thank you Bryce, I think I am going to get one of those Mulitech modems I hear you talking about. The docs say it requires an antenna, I guess that means I'm going to be getting on the roof? Do all the dedicated modems take such antenna's?
Bryce Norwood - NowSMS Support
Board Administrator
Username: Bryce

Post Number: 5747
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 06:46 pm:   

Hi Daniel,

I've got a Multitech GSM/GPRS modem that I use in our lab. It came with a small external antenna ... basically just a 2 inch extender that comes out of the back of the modem next to where the cable and power supply connect to the modem.

For basic use that is sufficient, as long as you have decent coverage where you plan to locate it.

There are, of course, more powerful external antennas that you could mount on your roof. Those would primarily be a consideration if you were locating the modem in a building with very poor signal from the mobile operator (as can sometimes be the case in server rooms).

Or, they could be a consideration for maximum performance. Or, if you have a large number of modems, you might use directional antennas to focus particular modems toward particular cells instead of having them all connect to the same cell.

-bn
Daniel
New member
Username: Coldfusion

Post Number: 5
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 03:08 am:   

Sounds great, I seem to have two choices:

1. MTCBA-G-F1 GSM/GPRS Class 10, 900/1800 MHz
2. MTCBA-G-F2 GSM/GPRS Class 10, 850/1900 MHz

It appears the only difference is the MHz, what can a 1900 do that 1800 can't? Or what do you recommend for the USA.

Thanks again
Bryce Norwood - NowSMS Support
Board Administrator
Username: Bryce

Post Number: 5752
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 05:40 pm:   

Hi Daniel,

The difference basically relates to the frequency bands that are used.

850/1900 is what is used in North America (more 1900 than 850, but the use of the 850 band has been growing in rural areas because it has a farther transmission range).

900/1800 is for outside of North America.

In Central & South America, and the Carribean frequency usage can vary ... some good resources for more information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GSM_frequency_ranges

http://www.gsmworld.com/roaming/gsminfo/index.shtml


-bn

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